A Comparison of Psychometric Functions for Detection in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners Psychometric functions (PFD) for the detection of pure tones were obtained with a two-interval forced-choice procedure from a group of listeners with normal hearing and a group of listeners with sensorineural impairments of presumed cochlear origin. Five PFDs were obtained for each group at each of the four test frequencies ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1990
A Comparison of Psychometric Functions for Detection in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn Hoberg Arehart
    University of Washington
  • Edward M. Burns
    University of Washington
  • Robert S. Schlauch
    University of Washington
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Kathryn Arehart, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, JG-15, Seattle, WA 98195.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1990
A Comparison of Psychometric Functions for Detection in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 433-439. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.433
History: Received August 14, 1989 , Accepted January 22, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 433-439. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.433
History: Received August 14, 1989; Accepted January 22, 1990

Psychometric functions (PFD) for the detection of pure tones were obtained with a two-interval forced-choice procedure from a group of listeners with normal hearing and a group of listeners with sensorineural impairments of presumed cochlear origin. Five PFDs were obtained for each group at each of the four test frequencies (500, 2000, 4000, and 8000 Hz). The slopes of PFDs were abnormally steep in some of the hearing-impaired listeners, but were statistically significant only at 2000 Hz.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This article is based upon a thesis by the first author submitted to the Graduate School of the University of Washington in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Science degree. Portions of these results were reported at the Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, New Orleans, LA, November, 1987. This research was supported by NIDCD Grants DC 00295 and DC 00520. The authors thank Walt Jesteadt and an anonymous reviewer for their helpful comments on a previous version of the manuscript. We also thank Robert Ling for technical assistance.
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