Modulation Transfer Functions A Comparison of the Results of Three Methods Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1990
Modulation Transfer Functions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane M. Scott
    Division of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
  • Larry E. Humes
    Division of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Diane M. Scott, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1212.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1990
Modulation Transfer Functions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 390-397. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.390
History: Received August 1, 1988 , Accepted September 29, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 390-397. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.390
History: Received August 1, 1988; Accepted September 29, 1989

Modulation transfer functions (MTFs) were measured with three different psychoacoustical paradigms in the same normal-hearing subjects. In the temporal-probe method, the threshold of a 4-ms probe tone (frequencies of 1000 and 4000 Hz) was measured at various envelope phases within a 100% sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) noise at modulation frequencies from 2 to 256 Hz. For the derived-MTF method, the threshold of a 500-ms tone at 1000 and 4000 Hz was measured in the same noise at the same modulation frequencies. For the modulation-detection paradigm, modulation thresholds were measured as a function of modulation frequency for bandpass filtered SAM noise centered at 1000 and 4000 Hz. MTFs with lowpass shapes were observed with all three methods. Differences were observed in the cutoff frequencies and/or attenuation rates when the data were fitted with lowpass filter transfer functions. Factors influencing those differences are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors express their gratitude to Judy Wallace and Debbie Hettinger for assistance in typing the manuscript and to Donald Riggs for assistance with some of the illustrations. Thanks are also expressed to Wes Grantham for providing assistance in the setup of the equipment for the three experiments. This work was supported, in part, by an RCDA awarded by NIH to the second author. Portions of this paper were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in New Orleans, November, 1987.
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