Statistical Comparison of Movement Amplitudes from Groupings of Normal Geriatric Speakers An implicit assumption of many studies of articulatory kinematics is that all normal speakers are equivalent, at least in a statistical sense. The present report investigated this assumption by performing post hoc analyses on random groups of 8 normal, geriatric males. Results of these analyses suggest that, at least for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1990
Statistical Comparison of Movement Amplitudes from Groupings of Normal Geriatric Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Forrest
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Gary Weismer
    Goodnight Hall and Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Scott Adams
    Goodnight Hall and Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Karen Forrest, 565 Waisman Center, 1500 Highland Avenue, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705-2280.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1990
Statistical Comparison of Movement Amplitudes from Groupings of Normal Geriatric Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 386-389. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.386
History: Received January 19, 1989 , Accepted October 24, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 386-389. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.386
History: Received January 19, 1989; Accepted October 24, 1989

An implicit assumption of many studies of articulatory kinematics is that all normal speakers are equivalent, at least in a statistical sense. The present report investigated this assumption by performing post hoc analyses on random groups of 8 normal, geriatric males. Results of these analyses suggest that, at least for the geriatric population, small numbers of subjects may not represent the parent population adequately, especially when the unit of statistical analysis is the individual trial. These findings have implications for the types of generalizations that can be made from studies with small samples and suggest the need for more comprehensive investigations of speech kinematics.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This project was supported in part by NINCDS grant NS-13274.
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