Complex and Pure-Tone Signals in the Evaluation of Hearing-Aid Characteristics In recent years, a number of commercially available systems have been developed to analyze the electroacoustic characteristics of hearing aids. In addition to pure-tone signals, these systems often use a wide variety of complex signals such as broadband noise, clicks, and multitonal complexes. In this paper, a number of practical ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1990
Complex and Pure-Tone Signals in the Evaluation of Hearing-Aid Characteristics
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia G. Stelmachowicz
    Boys Town National Institute for Communication Disorders in Children, Omaha, NE
  • Dawna E. Lewis
    Boys Town National Institute for Communication Disorders in Children, Omaha, NE
  • Richard C. Seewald
    University of Western Ontario
  • David B. Hawkins
    University of South Carolina
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Patricia Stelmachowicz, Boys Town National Institute for Communication Disorders in Children, 555 N. 30th Street, Omaha, NE 68131.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1990
Complex and Pure-Tone Signals in the Evaluation of Hearing-Aid Characteristics
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 380-385. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.380
History: Received March 28, 1989 , Accepted November 3, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 380-385. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.380
History: Received March 28, 1989; Accepted November 3, 1989

In recent years, a number of commercially available systems have been developed to analyze the electroacoustic characteristics of hearing aids. In addition to pure-tone signals, these systems often use a wide variety of complex signals such as broadband noise, clicks, and multitonal complexes. In this paper, a number of practical and theoretical issues concerning the use of pure-tone and complex signals in the evaluation of hearing-aid characteristics are described. The circumstances under which discrepancies in estimated gain and maximum output might occur using these two types of signals are described and the clinical implications of these differences are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors thank George Frye, Michael Gorga, and Robert Shannon for comments on an earlier version of this paper, and Betsy From for assistance in the preparation of the manuscript.
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