Content Analysis and Intratest Performance Profiles on the Columbia and the TONI This research note presents the results of a content analysis of the Columbia Mental Maturity Scale and the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (TONI). We also compared the intratest performance of a selected sample of language-impaired (LI) and MA-matched normal language children on these two tests. These analyses are an extension ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1990
Content Analysis and Intratest Performance Profiles on the Columbia and the TONI
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    Memphis State University
  • Jill S. Minor
    Memphis State University
  • Daria Mauer
    Memphis State University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Alan G. Kamhi, Memphis Speech and Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1990
Content Analysis and Intratest Performance Profiles on the Columbia and the TONI
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 375-379. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.375
History: Received May 1, 1989 , Accepted October 30, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 375-379. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.375
History: Received May 1, 1989; Accepted October 30, 1989

This research note presents the results of a content analysis of the Columbia Mental Maturity Scale and the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (TONI). We also compared the intratest performance of a selected sample of language-impaired (LI) and MA-matched normal language children on these two tests. These analyses are an extension of Johnston’s (1982) report on the Leiter. The content analysis revealed differences in the nature of perceptual and conceptual items on the Columbia and the TONI. Consistent with Johnston’s findings, the intratest comparisons revealed no significant group differences. LI and normal-language children performed significantly better on the perceptual-type items than the conceptual-type items. The predominance of perceptual items was particularly evident in the TONI.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors wish to thank Lauren Nelson, Rene Friemoth Lee, Kenn Apel, and Betholyn Gentry for their assistance in collecting the data. Thanks also go to Judith Johnston, Robin Chapman, Susan Ellis Weismer, and Tom Klee for their helpful comments on an earlier version of this paper. Appreciation is extended to the Memphis City School System and Marion County Schools for making children available for this study.
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