Using Simultaneous Nasometry and Standard Audio Recordings to Detect the Acoustic Onsets and Offsets of Speech Simultaneously collected nasometric and standard audio recording data were compared to determine the extent to which the acoustic onsets and offsets of speech could be determined from Nasometric signals. Three male and 2 female subjects produced six repetitions of 12 utterances that were initiated and terminated by vowels and consonants ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1990
Using Simultaneous Nasometry and Standard Audio Recordings to Detect the Acoustic Onsets and Offsets of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Earl J. Seaver, III
    Department of Communicative Disorders Northern Illinois University
  • Rodger M. Dalston
    Department of Surgery, Dental Ecology and the Dental Research Center School of Medicine University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • This research was supported by Grants DEO7105 and DE06957 of the National Institutes of Health. Requests for reprints should be sent to Earl J. Seaver, III, Department of Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1990
Using Simultaneous Nasometry and Standard Audio Recordings to Detect the Acoustic Onsets and Offsets of Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 358-362. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.358
History: Received January 13, 1989 , Accepted October 24, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 358-362. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.358
History: Received January 13, 1989; Accepted October 24, 1989

Simultaneously collected nasometric and standard audio recording data were compared to determine the extent to which the acoustic onsets and offsets of speech could be determined from Nasometric signals. Three male and 2 female subjects produced six repetitions of 12 utterances that were initiated and terminated by vowels and consonants of differing phonetic features. The onset of Nasometer output typically followed output from the standard audio recording system by an average of 29 ms (SD = 36.1 ms). A greater temporal discrepancy was observed for signal offsets (mean Nasometer lag = 100 ms; SD = 83.3 ms). Large differences between the two instruments seemed due to differences in their overall sensitivities. The results suggest that the Nasometer may be of limited value in determining the acoustic onsets and offsets of speech. The Nasometer was not designed to sense the acoustic events studied here, and the current results have no bearing whatsoever on the validity of this instrument in providing information concerning nasal resonance.

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