Short-Term Stability Measures for the Evaluation of Vocal Quality The vocal quality of 64 normal subjects and 57 subjects suffering various degrees of glottal cancer was investigated using acoustic measures of six different aspects of the voice signal: tone period perturbation, amplitude perturbation, waveform perturbation, vocal noise, spectral periodicity and spectral distortion. The measures were estimated taking the glottal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1990
Short-Term Stability Measures for the Evaluation of Vocal Quality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. Feijoo
    Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Santiago, Spain
  • C. Hernández
    Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Santiago, Spain
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Sergio Feijoo, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago, 15706 Santiago (La Coruna) Spain.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1990
Short-Term Stability Measures for the Evaluation of Vocal Quality
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 324-334. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.324
History: Received March 6, 1989 , Accepted November 3, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 324-334. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.324
History: Received March 6, 1989; Accepted November 3, 1989

The vocal quality of 64 normal subjects and 57 subjects suffering various degrees of glottal cancer was investigated using acoustic measures of six different aspects of the voice signal: tone period perturbation, amplitude perturbation, waveform perturbation, vocal noise, spectral periodicity and spectral distortion. The measures were estimated taking the glottal cycle as temporal reference unit to make the influence of the differences in tone period from one person to another as low as possible. The measures were evaluated with regard to (a) their ability to discriminate between healthy and sick subjects, and (b) their correlation with the perceptual evaluation of four trained listeners. The results suggest that signal processing techniques are unsatisfactory for clinical diagnoses but useful for monitoring voice quality.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work was carried out in the Department of Electrical Engineering of the University of Utsunomiya (Japan). I wish to express my gratitude to Professor Hideki Kasuya for his kindness and patience, and for many helpful discussions, also to Professor Yoshinobu Kikuchi and Kiyomasa Hasegawa, for all the help received.
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