The Timing of Syllable Repetitions in Developmental Dyslexia The temporal organization of motor speech was examined in dyslexic dolescents and adults without overt speech difficulties, matched normal readers, and learning disabled adolescents without reading difficulties. Subjects were asked to repeat nonsense two- and three-syllable strings in time to each of four metronome speeds. Speech samples were analyzed for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1990
The Timing of Syllable Repetitions in Developmental Dyslexia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Peter H. Wolff
    Psychiatry-Research, The Children’s Hospital, Boston
  • George F. Michel
    Psychiatry-Research, The Children’s Hospital, Boston
  • Marsha Ovrut
    Psychiatry-Research, The Children’s Hospital, Boston
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Peter H. Wolff, The Children’s Hospital, Psychiatry-Research, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1990
The Timing of Syllable Repetitions in Developmental Dyslexia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 281-289. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.281
History: Received November 11, 1988 , Accepted October 13, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 281-289. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.281
History: Received November 11, 1988; Accepted October 13, 1989

The temporal organization of motor speech was examined in dyslexic dolescents and adults without overt speech difficulties, matched normal readers, and learning disabled adolescents without reading difficulties. Subjects were asked to repeat nonsense two- and three-syllable strings in time to each of four metronome speeds. Speech samples were analyzed for repetition rates, time coherence between prescribed and actual performance, and serial ordering of three-syllable strings. Dyslexic subjects deviated more from the prescribed rate, repeated syllables too slowly at all metronome speeds, and made more speech sequencing errors than normal or learning disabled controls. Repetition rate and syllable sequencing contributed as independent variables to the temporal organization of motor speech. The relevance of motor speech deficits for reading impairment in dyslexia is discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Work for this project was supported by an NICHD research grant 16107, and in part by Mental Retardation Center Grant P30-HD 18655 from NICHD.
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