Oral Structure Nonspeech Motor Control in Normal, Dysarthric, Aphasic and Apraxic Speakers Isometric Force and Static Position Control Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1990
Oral Structure Nonspeech Motor Control in Normal, Dysarthric, Aphasic and Apraxic Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Malcolm R. McNeil
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Gary Weismer
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Scott Adams
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Moira Mulligan
    Medical Center of Vermont
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Malcolm R. McNeil, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin, 1975 Willow Drive, Madison, WI 53706.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1990
Oral Structure Nonspeech Motor Control in Normal, Dysarthric, Aphasic and Apraxic Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 255-268. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.255
History: Received January 18, 1989 , Accepted October 13, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 255-268. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.255
History: Received January 18, 1989; Accepted October 13, 1989

This study investigated the isometric force and static position control of the upper lip, lower lip, tongue, jaw, and finger in four subject groups (normal control, apraxia of speech, conduction aphasia, and ataxic dysarthria) at two force and displacement levels. Results from both the force and position tasks suggested that the apraxic and dysarthric groups tended to produce significantly greater instability than the normal group, although the pattern of instability across articulators was not systematic within or across the force and position experiments for subjects within or between groups. The conduction aphasic group produced force and position stability that typically was not significantly different from any of the remaining three groups, suggesting that their force and position stability as indexed in the present study fell somewhere between that of the normal group and the apraxic and dysarthric groups. It is suggested that other analyses of force and position control, such as descriptive accounts of the trial-by-trial time histories, might shed additional light on the speech and orofacial sensorimotor control deficits in persons with apraxia, dysarthria, and conduction aphasia.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was supported by NINCDS Grant #NS18797 and NINCDS Core Grant 5030 HD03352. We wish to express our appreciation to Dr. John C. Rosenbek, Dr. Claudia Blair, Dr. Linda Hunter, Dr. Michael Caligiuri, Dr. E. Jeffrey Metter, and Ann Fennell, for assistance with various aspects of this study. We also express our appreciation to Deborah Brauer and Milly Boyer for assistance with manuscript preparation. Sincere appreciation is also extended to the associate editors (Drs. Craig Linebaugh and Anne Smith) and the reviewers (Drs. Steven Barlow, Donald Robin, Chris Moore) for their helpful comments and suggestions.
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