Speech Perception with a Single-Channel Cochlear Implant A Comparison with a Single-Channel Tactile Device Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1990
Speech Perception with a Single-Channel Cochlear Implant
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Arlene Earley Carney
    Boys Town National Research Hospital
  • Marjorie Kienle
    Indiana University School of Medicine
  • Richard T. Miyamoto
    Indiana University School of Medicine
  • Request for reprints should be sent to Arlene Earley Carney, Boys Town National Institute Research Hospital, 555 N. 30th Street, Omaha, NE 68131.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1990
Speech Perception with a Single-Channel Cochlear Implant
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 229-237. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.237
History: Received June 21, 1989 , Accepted October 6, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1990, Vol. 33, 229-237. doi:10.1044/jshr.3302.237
History: Received June 21, 1989; Accepted October 6, 1989

Suprasegmental and segmental speech perception tasks were administered to 8 patients with single-channel cochlear implants. Suprasegmental tasks included the recognition of syllable number, syllabic stress, and intonation. Segmental tasks included the recognition of vowels and consonants in three modalities: visual only, implant only, and visual + implant. Results were compared to those obtained from artificially deafened adults using a single-channel vibrotactile device (Carney, 1988; Carney & Beachler, 1986). The patterns of responses for both suprasegmental and segmental tasks were highly similar for both groups of subjects, despite differences between the characteristics of the subject samples. These results suggest that single-channel sensory devices, whether they be cochlear implants or vibrotactile aids, produce similar patterns of speech perception errors, even when differences are observed in overall performance level.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors would like to acknowledge Edward J. Carney for his assistance in the preparation of this manuscript. In addition, we would like to thank the 8 subjects who gave their time so generously to participate in this study.
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