Frequency Selectivity and Comodulation Masking Release in Adults and in 6-Year-Old Children Frequency selectivity and comodulation masking release (CMR) for a 1000-Hz signal frequency were examined in 6-year-old children and adults. An abbreviated measure of frequency selectivity was also conducted for a 500-Hz signal. Frequency selectivity was measured using a notched-noise masking method, and CMR was measured using narrow bands of noise ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1990
Frequency Selectivity and Comodulation Masking Release in Adults and in 6-Year-Old Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathleen Veloso
    The Division of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina Medical School, Chapel Hill
  • Joseph W. Hall, III
    The Division of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina Medical School, Chapel Hill
  • John H. Grose
    The Division of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina Medical School, Chapel Hill
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Joseph W. Hall, the Division of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina Medical School, Chapel Hill, NC 27514.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1990
Frequency Selectivity and Comodulation Masking Release in Adults and in 6-Year-Old Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 96-102. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.96
History: Received March 20, 1989 , Accepted August 17, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 96-102. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.96
History: Received March 20, 1989; Accepted August 17, 1989

Frequency selectivity and comodulation masking release (CMR) for a 1000-Hz signal frequency were examined in 6-year-old children and adults. An abbreviated measure of frequency selectivity was also conducted for a 500-Hz signal. Frequency selectivity was measured using a notched-noise masking method, and CMR was measured using narrow bands of noise whose amplitude envelopes were either uncorrelated or correlated. There were 6 listeners in each age group. No differences were observed between the adults and children for either auditory measure. Similarly, no differences were observed in the ability to detect a pure-tone signal in a relatively wideband noise masker. When the masking noise was narrowband, however, the masked thresholds of the children were higher than those of the adults. Two characteristics that distinguish narrowband noise from wideband noise are: (1) narrowband noise has a pitch quality corresponding to its center frequency, whereas wideband noise does not have a definite pitch; (2) the intensity fluctuations are relatively greater in narrowband noise than in wideband noise. This may suggest that 6-year-old children have a reduced ability to detect signals in noise backgrounds where the signal has perceptual qualities similar to the noise, or in noise backgrounds having a high degree of fluctuation.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This work was supported by a grant from NIH NINCDS (R01 NS22046). We are grateful for helpful comments from Lynne Olsho, Fred Wightman, and an anonymous reviewer.
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