Imitation of Intonation by Infants Children between 9 and 12 months of age were studied to determine if they would spontaneously imitate either the average fundamental frequency or the fundamental frequency contour of their speaking partners. In the first experiment, children were recorded at home as they interacted with their fathers and mothers. Acoustic analyses ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1990
Imitation of Intonation by Infants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gerald M. Siegel
    University of Minnesota
  • Martha Cooper
    University of Minnesota
  • James L. Morgan
    University of Minnesota
  • Robin Brenneise-Sarshad
    University of Minnesota
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Gerald M. Siegel, University of Minnesota, Department of Communication Disorders, 110 Shevlin Hall, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1990
Imitation of Intonation by Infants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 9-15. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.09
History: Received August 22, 1988 , Accepted June 16, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 9-15. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.09
History: Received August 22, 1988; Accepted June 16, 1989

Children between 9 and 12 months of age were studied to determine if they would spontaneously imitate either the average fundamental frequency or the fundamental frequency contour of their speaking partners. In the first experiment, children were recorded at home as they interacted with their fathers and mothers. Acoustic analyses failed to reveal any tendency on the part of the infants to adjust vocal pitch, amplitude, or duration to those of their speaking partners. In a second experiment, children were recorded while interacting with their parents in a laboratory setting. Again, there were no indications that the children imitated the vocal patterns of their speaking partners.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access