Development of Children with Early Language Delay Four children with early language delays (ELD) were compared to a control group of 12 children with respect to their preschool language abilities from age 2 1/2 to 5 years and their verbal skills at the end of Grade 2. The language-delayed children each initially showed severe and broad impairments ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1990
Development of Children with Early Language Delay
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hollis S. Scarborough
    Brooklyn College of the City University of New York
  • Wanda Dobrich
    Rutgers the State University of New Jersey
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Hollis Scarborough, Psychology Department, Brooklyn College of CUNY, Brooklyn, NY 11210.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1990
Development of Children with Early Language Delay
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 70-83. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.70
History: Received November 7, 1988 , Accepted July 21, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 70-83. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.70
History: Received November 7, 1988; Accepted July 21, 1989

Four children with early language delays (ELD) were compared to a control group of 12 children with respect to their preschool language abilities from age 2 1/2 to 5 years and their verbal skills at the end of Grade 2. The language-delayed children each initially showed severe and broad impairments in syntactic, phonological, and lexical production. Over time, their deficits became milder and more selective, such that normal or nearly normal speech and language proficiency was exhibited by age 60 months. Nevertheless, when followed up 3 years later, three of the four cases were severely reading disabled. These findings are discussed with respect to prior findings and hypotheses about the sequelae of early language delay and the relationship of language development to reading achievement.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The research was supported in part by grants HD18409, HD18571, and HD22351 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. We are grateful to Maria Hager, Karin Lifter, Pam Johnson, and Janet Wyckoff for their contributions to the collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data. We are also deeply indebted to the subjects and their families for their participation in the project. Some of the findings were reported previously to the Wisconsin Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders.
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