Speech Breathing in Children and Adolescents An investigation was conducted to elucidate the nature of speech breathing in children and adolescents and to determine if sex and age influence performance. Eighty healthy boys and girls representing four age groups (7, 10, 13, and 16 years) were studied using helium dilution to obtain measures of subdivisions of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1990
Speech Breathing in Children and Adolescents
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders, Tucson
  • Thomas J. Hixon
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders, Tucson
  • Peter J. Watson
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders, Tucson
  • Wayne J. Morgan
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders, Tucson
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Jeannette D. Hoit, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1990
Speech Breathing in Children and Adolescents
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 51-69. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.51
History: Received January 27, 1989 , Accepted July 19, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 51-69. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.51
History: Received January 27, 1989; Accepted July 19, 1989

An investigation was conducted to elucidate the nature of speech breathing in children and adolescents and to determine if sex and age influence performance. Eighty healthy boys and girls representing four age groups (7, 10, 13, and 16 years) were studied using helium dilution to obtain measures of subdivisions of the lung volume and using magnetometers to obtain measures of resting tidal breathing and speech breathing. Results for subdivisions of the lung volume and resting tidal breathing revealed sex- and age-related differences, most of which were attributable to differences in breathing apparatus size. Results for speech breathing indicated that sex was not an important variable, but that age was critical in determining speech breathing performance. The most substantial differences were between the 7-year-old group and older groups. These differences were characterized by larger lung volume, rib cage volume, and abdominal volume initiations and terminations for breath groups, larger lung volume excursions per breath group, fewer numbers of syllables per breath group, and larger lung volume expenditures per syllable for the 7-year-old group compared to older groups. In most respects, speech breathing appeared adultlike by the end of the first decade of life. Clinical implications regarding these findings are offered.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This work was supported by Research Grant DC-00281 and Clinical Investigator Development Award DC-00030 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, and Clinical Investigator Award HL-01372 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. We respectfully dedicate this article to the memories of Dennis H. Klatt and Carol A. Prutting.
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