Frequency, Intensity, and Target Matching Effects on Photoglottographic Measures of Open Quotient and Speed Quotient Measurements of Open Quotient (OQ) and Speed Quotient (SQ) were made from photoglottographic signals of normal male subjects during phonation. Samples were obtained at spontaneous levels of fundamental frequency and intensity, and at nine specified frequency/intensity combinations. OQ increased with fundamental frequency. OQ change was not significant for change in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1990
Frequency, Intensity, and Target Matching Effects on Photoglottographic Measures of Open Quotient and Speed Quotient
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David G. Hanson
    University of California at Los Angeles
  • Bruce R. Gerratt
    University of California at Los Angeles
  • Gerald S. Berke
    University of California at Los Angeles
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to David G. Hanson, Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-3008.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1990
Frequency, Intensity, and Target Matching Effects on Photoglottographic Measures of Open Quotient and Speed Quotient
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 45-50. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.45
History: Received December 15, 1988 , Accepted July 18, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 45-50. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.45
History: Received December 15, 1988; Accepted July 18, 1989

Measurements of Open Quotient (OQ) and Speed Quotient (SQ) were made from photoglottographic signals of normal male subjects during phonation. Samples were obtained at spontaneous levels of fundamental frequency and intensity, and at nine specified frequency/intensity combinations. OQ increased with fundamental frequency. OQ change was not significant for change in intensity and there was no significant interaction between frequency and intensity. Changes in SQ with variations of frequency and intensity were not significant. However, SQ did increase significantly when spontaneous phonation was compared to target matching phonation at similar frequency/intensity. Changes in both OQ and SQ across comfortable frequency and intensity ranges were relatively small in comparison to changes in OQ and SQ reported for pathological phonation.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
We wish to thank Thomas Chasse for his important contributions to this work, and his efforts in the acquisition and analysis of this data. We also wish to acknowledge the assistance of Rom Karin, Kristin Precoda, and Mark Torres. This work was supported by Grant NS 20707 from the National Institutes of Health and by Veterans Administration Medical Research funds.
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