Some Constraints on Functionally Disordered Phonologies Phonetic Inventories and Phonotactics Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1990
Some Constraints on Functionally Disordered Phonologies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel A. Dinnsen
    Department of Linguistics, Indiana University
  • Steven B. Chin
    Department of Linguistics, Indiana University
  • Mary Elbert
    Indiana University
  • Thomas W. Powell
    Ball State University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Daniel A. Dinnsen, Department of Linguistics, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1990
Some Constraints on Functionally Disordered Phonologies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 28-37. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.28
History: Received January 23, 1989 , Accepted July 6, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 28-37. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.28
History: Received January 23, 1989; Accepted July 6, 1989

The phonological systems of 40 functional misarticulators, ages 40 to 80 months were examined in terms of the nature and variation of phonetic inventories and phonotactic constraints. It was found that these properties of disordered systems were governed by severe constraints that yielded a typological characterization of such systems along with associated implicational laws. The principles governing disordered systems were also found to parallel closely the principles governing normal first language acquisition. The evidence suggests that at least these properties of disordered systems represent delays in the normal acquisition process and are not otherwise deviant. The assessment and treatment of functional disorders along with the projection of learning patterns can thus appeal to principles governing such phonological systems.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
We would like to thank Phil Connell, Fred Eckman, Judith Gierut, and Carol Stoel-Gammon for their comments and suggestions during the course of this research. Portions of this paper were presented at the 1988 convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Boston and at the 1988 annual meeting of the Linguistic Society of America in New Orleans. This work was supported in part by a grant to Indiana University from the National Institutes of Health, No. NS20976.
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