Visual Biasing of Normal and Impaired Auditory Speech Perception Intersensory biasing occurs when cues in one sensory modality influence the perception of discrepant cues in another modality. Visual biasing of auditory stop consonant perception was examined in two related experiments in an attempt to clarify the role of hearing impairment on susceptibility to visual biasing of auditory speech perception. ... Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   March 01, 1990
Visual Biasing of Normal and Impaired Auditory Speech Perception
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian E. Walden
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DC
  • Allen A. Montgomery
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DC
  • Robert A. Prosek
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DC
  • David B. Hawkins
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DC
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Brian E. Walden, Army Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307-5001.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1990
Visual Biasing of Normal and Impaired Auditory Speech Perception
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 163-173. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.163
History: Received January 13, 1989 , Accepted September 28, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 163-173. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.163
History: Received January 13, 1989; Accepted September 28, 1989

Intersensory biasing occurs when cues in one sensory modality influence the perception of discrepant cues in another modality. Visual biasing of auditory stop consonant perception was examined in two related experiments in an attempt to clarify the role of hearing impairment on susceptibility to visual biasing of auditory speech perception. Fourteen computer-generated acoustic approximations of consonant-vowel syllables forming a /ba-da-ga/ continuum were presented for labeling as one of the three exemplars, via audition alone and in synchrony with natural visual articulations of /ba/ and of /ga/. Labeling functions were generated for each test condition showing the percentage of /ba/, /da/, and /ga/ responses to each of the 14 synthetic syllables. The subjects of the first experiment were 15 normal-hearing and 15 hearing-impaired observers. The hearing-impaired subjects demonstrated a greater susceptibility to biasing from visual cues than did the normal-hearing subjects. In the second experiment, the auditory stimuli were presented in a low-level background noise to 15 normal-hearing observers. A comparison of their labeling responses with those from the first experiment suggested that hearing-impaired persons may develop a propensity to rely on visual cues as a result of long-term hearing impairment. The results are discussed in terms of theories of intersensory bias.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This work was supported by the Department of Clinical Investigation, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, under Work Units #2559 and #2583, and was approved by the Center’s Human Use Committee. All subjects studied in this investigation provided written informed consent prior to their participation. The opinions and assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense. Mary Cord and David Karpinski contributed to the data collection and computer programming of this project.
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