Relationships Between Selected Auditory and Phonatory Latency Measures in Normal Speakers Interaction between auditory and phonatory systems was explored in normal speakers by comparing laryngeal reaction time (LRT) with interpeak intervals from the auditory brainstem response (ABR) obtained using high and low stimulus presentation rates. Thirty-four subjects with no history of neurological or speech-language disorders and normal hearing sensitivity participated. Interpeak ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1990
Relationships Between Selected Auditory and Phonatory Latency Measures in Normal Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sheila V. Stager
    University of Texas at Dallas
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Sheila V. Stager, National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders (NIDCD) Intramural Research Program Speech and Voice Unit, Bldg 10, Room 5C-218, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892.
  • * Currently affiliated with National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders (NIDCD), Bethesda, MD.
    Currently affiliated with National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders (NIDCD), Bethesda, MD.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1990
Relationships Between Selected Auditory and Phonatory Latency Measures in Normal Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 156-162. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.156
History: Received January 31, 1989 , Accepted September 15, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 156-162. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.156
History: Received January 31, 1989; Accepted September 15, 1989

Interaction between auditory and phonatory systems was explored in normal speakers by comparing laryngeal reaction time (LRT) with interpeak intervals from the auditory brainstem response (ABR) obtained using high and low stimulus presentation rates. Thirty-four subjects with no history of neurological or speech-language disorders and normal hearing sensitivity participated. Interpeak intervals were derived from ABR’s recorded for each ear at rates of 21.1 and 91.1 clicks/s. LRT responses were obtained by instructing subjects to sustain an /s/ and then phonate an /a/ as fast as possible following visual cues. Two measures of reaction time performance were derived, Mean Laryngeal Reaction Time (MLRT) and Best Laryngeal Reaction Time (BLRT). Linear regression analyses were completed between each measure of reaction time performance and each ABR interpeak interval. Using either LRT measure, two significant (p < .05) positive linear relationships were found. One involved the interpeak interval between Waves III and V and the other involved the interpeak interval between Waves I and V. Both were recorded at high stimulus presentation rates. These results support the small body of literature from normal speakers, stutterers, and spasmodic dysphonics suggesting interaction between the auditory and phonatory systems at the brainstem level.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This paper presents a portion of a doctoral dissertation submitted to the University of Texas at Dallas. The author would like to acknowledge Terese Finitzo for agreeing to perform the reliability checks on the ABR waveforms. The author wishes to acknowledge Terry Carracuzo for developing the software to run the laryngeal reaction time paradigm. The author also wishes to acknowledge her dissertation advisor, Frances Freeman, and the remainder of her committee, including Terese Finitzo, Ted Langford, George Gerken, and Robert Stillman. The author would also like to thank Frances Freeman, Ben Watson, Ken Pool, Terese Finitzo, and Emily Tobey for both their substantive and editorial comments on earlier versions of this paper.
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