Rapid Manual Abilities in Spasmodic Dysphonic and Normal Female Subjects This study quantitatively examined upper extremity motor performance in 18 spasmodic dysphonic females, in comparison to matched normal controls, across variables of finger lift reaction time, index finger tapping speed, and peg placing (Purdue Pegboard) speed. Significant differences were noted for both upper extremities on the finger tapping and pegboard ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1990
Rapid Manual Abilities in Spasmodic Dysphonic and Normal Female Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael P. Cannito
    Department of Speech Communication, University of Texas at Austin
  • George V. Kondraske
    Human Performance Institute, University of Texas at Arlington
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Michael P. Cannito, Department of Speech Communication, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712–1089.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1990
Rapid Manual Abilities in Spasmodic Dysphonic and Normal Female Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 123-133. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.123
History: Received January 30, 1989 , Accepted August 25, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 123-133. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.123
History: Received January 30, 1989; Accepted August 25, 1989

This study quantitatively examined upper extremity motor performance in 18 spasmodic dysphonic females, in comparison to matched normal controls, across variables of finger lift reaction time, index finger tapping speed, and peg placing (Purdue Pegboard) speed. Significant differences were noted for both upper extremities on the finger tapping and pegboard tasks, with better performance by the controls. A linear combination of these manual variables was able to discriminate the spasmodic dysphonic from matched normal subjects with 78% accuracy. Motor performance was uncorrelated with psychometric measures of anxiety and depression in both groups. The dysphonic subjects exhibited a significant correlation between nondominant finger tapping speed and severity ratings of motor speech impairment. Possible localizing significance of these findings is discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This study is based in part on the first author’s doctoral dissertation at the University of Texas at Dallas, 1986. He gratefully acknowledges Dr. George M. Gerken for chairing the supervisory committee. It was supported by NIH Grant NS 18276. The authors acknowledge principal investigators, Drs. Frances J. Freeman and Terese Finitzo, for their encouragement and assistance with various aspects of this research. The authors also thank Drs. Harvey M. Sussman and Thomas P. Marquardt for their preliminary reviews of the manuscript. Portions of this article were originally presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 1987.
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