Predicting Voice Quality of Deaf Speakers on the Basis of Glottal Characteristics Twenty profoundly deaf and 5 normal-hearing subjects produced 225 sustained vowels /a, i, u/ at different pitch levels and 75 phonetically balanced sentences, while vocal fold vibration was recorded through an electrolaryngograph (ELG). The utterances recorded on audio tape were judged by 10 experienced listeners on general voice quality, breathiness, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1990
Predicting Voice Quality of Deaf Speakers on the Basis of Glottal Characteristics
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nico Arends
    The Nijmegen Institute for Cognition Research and Information Technology, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Dirk-Jan Povel
    The Nijmegen Institute for Cognition Research and Information Technology, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Edward Van Os
    Instituut voor Doven, St. Michielsgestel, The Netherlands
  • Leo Speth
    Instituut voor Doven, St. Michielsgestel, The Netherlands
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Nico Arends, University of Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1990
Predicting Voice Quality of Deaf Speakers on the Basis of Glottal Characteristics
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 116-122. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.116
History: Received March 31, 1989 , Accepted August 10, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 116-122. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.116
History: Received March 31, 1989; Accepted August 10, 1989

Twenty profoundly deaf and 5 normal-hearing subjects produced 225 sustained vowels /a, i, u/ at different pitch levels and 75 phonetically balanced sentences, while vocal fold vibration was recorded through an electrolaryngograph (ELG). The utterances recorded on audio tape were judged by 10 experienced listeners on general voice quality, breathiness, hoarseness, and laryngeal strain on a 5-point scale. Seven parameters describing time-domain characteristics of the ELG-signal were extracted online by a special purpose computer system. Measurements were made over 500 consecutive vibratory cycles (10-cycle window), yielding a mean and standard deviation for each parameter per utterance. All data were submitted to analysis of variance and multiple regression analyses. Multiple correlations between glottal parameters and judged voice deviations varied between .46 and .70 indicating that overall prediction cannot reliably be based on these parameters, although severe cases of deaf voice deviations may be detectable.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
We would like to thank Ellis Visser for her assistance in the statistical analyses of the data, and Frans Gremmen for his advice on these same analyses. This research was funded by the Instituut voor Doven at St. Michielsgestel, The Netherlands.
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