Listener Experience and Perception of Voice Quality Five speech-language clinicians and 5 naive listeners rated the similarity of pairs of normal and dysphonic voices. Multidimensional scaling was used to determine the voice characteristics that were perceptually important for each voice set and listener group. Solution spaces were compared to determine if clinical experience affects perceptual strategies. Naive ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1990
Listener Experience and Perception of Voice Quality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jody Kreiman
    VA Medical Center, West Los Angeles, and UCLA School of Medicine
  • Bruce R. Gerratt
    VA Medical Center, West Los Angeles, and UCLA School of Medicine
  • Kristin Precoda
    VA Medical Center, West Los Angeles, and UCLA School of Medicine
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Jody Kreiman, VA Medical Center, Audiology and Speech Pathology (126), Wilshire and Sawtelle Boulevards, Los Angeles, CA 90073.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1990
Listener Experience and Perception of Voice Quality
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 103-115. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.103
History: Received May 5, 1989 , Accepted August 18, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1990, Vol. 33, 103-115. doi:10.1044/jshr.3301.103
History: Received May 5, 1989; Accepted August 18, 1989

Five speech-language clinicians and 5 naive listeners rated the similarity of pairs of normal and dysphonic voices. Multidimensional scaling was used to determine the voice characteristics that were perceptually important for each voice set and listener group. Solution spaces were compared to determine if clinical experience affects perceptual strategies. Naive and expert listeners attended to different aspects of voice quality when judging the similarity of voices, for both normal and pathological voices. All naive listeners used similar perceptual strategies; however, individual clinicians differed substantially in the parameters they considered important when judging similarity. These differences were large enough to suggest that care must be taken when using data averaged across clinicians, because averaging obscures important aspects of an individual’s perceptual behavior.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This research was supported by NINCDS award NS20707, by a NINCDS post-doctoral traineeship to the first author (NS07059), and by Veterans Administration Rehabilitation Re-search and Development grant C468-R. We thank Gerald Berke, David Hanson, Jean Holle, and Jill Zweier for serving as sub-jects. We also thank Peter Ladefoged and the UCLA Phonetics Laboratory for use of their digital spectrograph.
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