Analytic Study of the Tadoma Method Effects of Hand Position on Segmental Speech Perception Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1989
Analytic Study of the Tadoma Method
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charlotte M. Reed
    Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Nathaniel I. Durlach
    Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Louis D. Braida
    Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Martin C. Schultz
    Southern Illinois University
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1989
Analytic Study of the Tadoma Method
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1989, Vol. 32, 921-929. doi:10.1044/jshr.3204.921
History: Received November 18, 1988 , Accepted May 19, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1989, Vol. 32, 921-929. doi:10.1044/jshr.3204.921
History: Received November 18, 1988; Accepted May 19, 1989

In the Tadoma method of communication, deaf-blind individuals receive speech by placing a hand on the face and neck of the talker and monitoring actions associated with speech production. Previous research has documented the speech perception, speech production, and linguistic abilities of highly experienced users of the Tadoma method. The current study was performed to gain further insight into the cues involved in the perception of speech segments through Tadoma. Small-set segmental identification experiments were conducted in which the subjects' access to various types of artieulatory information was systematically varied by imposing limitations on the contact of the hand with the face. Results obtained on 3 deaf-blind, highly experienced users of Tadoma were examined in terms of percent-correct scores, information transfer, and reception of speech features for each of sixteen experimental conditions. The results were generally consistent with expectations based on the speech cues assumed to be available in the various hand positions.

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