Effects of Click Rate and Electrode Orientation on Threshold of the Auditory Brainstem Response This study evaluated the effects of stimulus presentation rate and electrode orientation on ABR threshold. Six normal-hearing adults served as subjects. ABRs were recorded from three orthogonal electrode pairs in response to click stimuli at rates of 48 and 21/s. Psychophysical thresholds were determined for each of these stimuli, and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1989
Effects of Click Rate and Electrode Orientation on Threshold of the Auditory Brainstem Response
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yvonne S. Sininger
    Electrophysiology Lab, House Ear Institute
  • Manuel Don
    Electrophysiology Lab, House Ear Institute
  • Portions of this paper were presented at American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, November, 1986, Detroit and The Biennial Meeting of the International Electric Response Audiometry Study Group, August, 1987, Charlottesville, VA.
    Portions of this paper were presented at American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, November, 1986, Detroit and The Biennial Meeting of the International Electric Response Audiometry Study Group, August, 1987, Charlottesville, VA.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1989
Effects of Click Rate and Electrode Orientation on Threshold of the Auditory Brainstem Response
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1989, Vol. 32, 880-886. doi:10.1044/jshr.3204.880
History: Received September 19, 1988 , Accepted April 21, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1989, Vol. 32, 880-886. doi:10.1044/jshr.3204.880
History: Received September 19, 1988; Accepted April 21, 1989

This study evaluated the effects of stimulus presentation rate and electrode orientation on ABR threshold. Six normal-hearing adults served as subjects. ABRs were recorded from three orthogonal electrode pairs in response to click stimuli at rates of 48 and 21/s. Psychophysical thresholds were determined for each of these stimuli, and ABRs were recorded with stimuli between 0 and 10 dB SL in 2-dB steps. A ratio of ABR signal strength to noise variance (Fsp) was the criterion used to define threshold. Specifically, an Fsp value of 2.25, equivalent to a 95% response confidence using 5 and 250 degrees of freedom, was the criterion used to determine response presence within a maximum of 10,000 sweeps per average. Results revealed that, for normal-hearing adult subjects, click rate up to 48/s does not influence the sensation level at which a detectable response can be found, and a nearly vertical electrode orientation is optimal for recording the response at low levels. The predicted difference between psychophysical and ABR thresholds with a vertical electrode orientation, using 10,000 sweeps per average, up to 48 clicks per second, and an Fsp criterion of 2.25 is 4.4 dB.

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