Speech Rate Reduction and "Nasality" in Normal Speakers This study explored the effects of reduced speech rate on nasal/voice accelerometric measures and nasality ratings. Nasal/voice accelerometric measures were obtained from normal adults for various speech stimuli and speaking rates. Stimuli included three sentences (one obstruent-loaded, one semivowel-loaded, and one containing a single nasal), and /p/ syllable trains. Speakers ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1989
Speech Rate Reduction and "Nasality" in Normal Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Therese M. Brancewicz
    University of Washington
  • Alan R. Reich
    University of Washington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1989
Speech Rate Reduction and "Nasality" in Normal Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1989, Vol. 32, 837-848. doi:10.1044/jshr.3204.837
History: Received January 24, 1989 , Accepted April 21, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1989, Vol. 32, 837-848. doi:10.1044/jshr.3204.837
History: Received January 24, 1989; Accepted April 21, 1989

This study explored the effects of reduced speech rate on nasal/voice accelerometric measures and nasality ratings. Nasal/voice accelerometric measures were obtained from normal adults for various speech stimuli and speaking rates. Stimuli included three sentences (one obstruent-loaded, one semivowel-loaded, and one containing a single nasal), and /p/ syllable trains. Speakers read the stimuli at their normal rate, half their normal rate, and as slowly as possible. In addition, a computer program paced each speaker at rates of 1, 2, and 3 syllables per second. The nasal/voice accelerometric values revealed significant stimulus effects but no rate effects. The nasality ratings of experienced listeners, evaluated as a function of stimulus and speaking rate, were compared to the accelerometric measures. The nasality scale values demonstrated small, but statistically significant, stimulus and rate effects. However, the nasality percepts were poorly correlated with the nasal/voice accelerometric measures.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access