Language Skills of Children with Different Preschool Experiences This study examined the language at age 5 of socioeconomically disadvantaged children who had been randomly assigned at birth to a language-enriched day care program with a parent education component, a parent education program without a language-enriched day care, or no treatment. The interventions were administered between the ages of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1989
Language Skills of Children with Different Preschool Experiences
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne Erwick Roberts
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, University of North Carolina
  • Shoshanna Rabinowitch
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, University of North Carolina
  • Donna M. Bryant
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, University of North Carolina
  • Margaret R. Burchinal
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, University of North Carolina
  • Matthew A. Koch
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, University of North Carolina
  • Craig T. Ramey
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, University of North Carolina
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1989
Language Skills of Children with Different Preschool Experiences
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1989, Vol. 32, 773-786. doi:10.1044/jshr.3204.773
History: Received April 18, 1988 , Accepted April 10, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1989, Vol. 32, 773-786. doi:10.1044/jshr.3204.773
History: Received April 18, 1988; Accepted April 10, 1989

This study examined the language at age 5 of socioeconomically disadvantaged children who had been randomly assigned at birth to a language-enriched day care program with a parent education component, a parent education program without a language-enriched day care, or no treatment. The interventions were administered between the ages of 3 months to 5 years. Language measures, reflecting children's ability to manipulate topics, as well as their structural complexity, semantic diversity, and general talkativeness were examined. The results showed that the disadvantaged children who attended the language-enriched day care program with the parent education component used a significantly greater proportion of high quality topic manipulation skills and less low quality topic manipulation skills during conversation than did children in the other two groups. The day care effect on high quality topic manipulation was present even after adjusting for children's intelligence and for the amount of community day care experience of the children in the parent education alone and control groups. No significant treatment differences were found for structural, semantic, and talkativeness measures. Implications of the result for early language intervention are discussed.

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