Visual Evoked Potentials Relation to Adult Speechreading and Cognitive Function Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1989
Visual Evoked Potentials
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jerker Rönnberg
    Department of Education and Psychology, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Stig Arlinger
    Department of Technical Audiology, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Björn Lyxell
    Department of Education and Psychology, Linköping University, Sweden and Department of Psychology, University of Umeå, Sweden
  • Catharina Kinnefors
    Department of Technical Audiology, Linköping University, Sweden
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1989
Visual Evoked Potentials
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1989, Vol. 32, 725-735. doi:10.1044/jshr.3204.725
History: Received January 11, 1988 , Accepted February 24, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1989, Vol. 32, 725-735. doi:10.1044/jshr.3204.725
History: Received January 11, 1988; Accepted February 24, 1989

This study investigated the putative relationship between visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and specific aspects of speechreading. The nature and constraints of the relationship between VEPs and cognitive functioning was also examined. The original finding of Shepherd, DeLavergne, Frueh, and Clobridge (1977) that visual-neural speed (VN 130) predicts speechreading skill was not replicated. However, the picture is rather complex in that we find significant correlations for some context-free word discrimination and sign-alphabet testing conditions. These correlations occur only for the VN 130/P 200 peak-to-peak amplitude measure, not for neural speed. Nevertheless, visual-neural speed (VN 130 and P 200) was relevant to certain aspects of long-term memory access (i.e., letter matching, Posner & Mitchell, 1967) and to complex short-term memory function (i.e., reading span, Baddeley, Logie, Nimmo-Smith, & Brereton, 1985).

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