Magnitude Estimation and Cross-Modal Matching of Lingual Vibrotactile and Auditory Sensation The present experiment was a preliminary attempt to use the psychophysical scaling methods of magnitude estimation and cross-modal matching to investigate suprathreshold judgments of lingual vibrotactile and auditory sensation magnitudes for 20 normal young adult subjects. A 250-Hz lingual vibrotactile stimulus and a 1000-Hz binaural auditory stimulus were employed. To ... Research Note
Research Note  |   September 01, 1989
Magnitude Estimation and Cross-Modal Matching of Lingual Vibrotactile and Auditory Sensation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Harris
    Healthcare Rehabilitation Center, Austin, TX
  • Donald Fucci
    Ohio University
  • Linda Petrosino
    Bowling Green State University
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   September 01, 1989
Magnitude Estimation and Cross-Modal Matching of Lingual Vibrotactile and Auditory Sensation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1989, Vol. 32, 698-702. doi:10.1044/jshr.3203.698
History: Received January 15, 1988 , Accepted December 9, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1989, Vol. 32, 698-702. doi:10.1044/jshr.3203.698
History: Received January 15, 1988; Accepted December 9, 1988

The present experiment was a preliminary attempt to use the psychophysical scaling methods of magnitude estimation and cross-modal matching to investigate suprathreshold judgments of lingual vibrotactile and auditory sensation magnitudes for 20 normal young adult subjects. A 250-Hz lingual vibrotactile stimulus and a 1000-Hz binaural auditory stimulus were employed. To obtain judgments for nonoral vibrotactile sensory magnitudes, the thenar eminence of the hand was also employed as a test site for 5 additional subjects. Eight stimulus intensities were presented during all experimental tasks. The results showed that the slopes of the log-log vibrotactile magnitude estimation functions decreased at higher stimulus intensity levels for both test sites. Auditory magnitude estimation functions were relatively constant throughout the stimulus range. Cross-modal matching functions for the two stimuli generally agreed with functions predicted from the magnitude estimation data, except when subjects adjusted vibration on the tongue to match auditory stimulus intensities. The results suggested that the methods of magnitude estimation and cross-modal matching may be useful for studying sensory processing in the speech production system. However, systematic investigation of response biases associated with vibrotactile-auditory psychophysical scaling tasks appears to be a prerequisite.

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