Cognitive Skills Associated with the Onset of Multiword Utterances The relationship between early language and cognition was studied in 20 children between one and two years of age. Linguistically, the subjects were classifed as No Word Users, Single Word Users, Nonproductive Syntax Users, and Productive Syntax Users. Four cognitive areas were tested: Object Permanence, Means-end, Play, and Imitation. When ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1989
Cognitive Skills Associated with the Onset of Multiword Utterances
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charleen A. Kelly
    University of Washington
  • Philip S. Dale
    University of Washington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1989
Cognitive Skills Associated with the Onset of Multiword Utterances
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1989, Vol. 32, 645-656. doi:10.1044/jshr.3203.645
History: Received March 29, 1988 , Accepted January 25, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1989, Vol. 32, 645-656. doi:10.1044/jshr.3203.645
History: Received March 29, 1988; Accepted January 25, 1989

The relationship between early language and cognition was studied in 20 children between one and two years of age. Linguistically, the subjects were classifed as No Word Users, Single Word Users, Nonproductive Syntax Users, and Productive Syntax Users. Four cognitive areas were tested: Object Permanence, Means-end, Play, and Imitation. When adjacent pairs of linguistic groups were compared in terms of specific cognitive skills demonstrated, several significant differences were found. First, a significant difference in Play was found between No Word Users and Single Word Users. Second, there were significant differences between Single Word Users and Nonproductive Syntax Users in terms of specific cognitive advances in both Imitation and Play. Third, Nonproductive and Productive Syntax Users were significantly different in Means-end skills. In accordance with the Correlational Hypothesis, specific cognitive skills seem temporally associated with some linguistic abilities, although attainment of skills can be evidenced first in language or cognition.

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