Some Effects of Variations in Response Time Latency on Speech Rate, Interruptions, and Fluency in Children's Speech The present study was designed to examine adult-child interactions during conversation with respect to the effects of adult paralinguistic speech variations on the speech production of children. Four 4-year-old children served as subjects. A single-subject A-B-A design with counterbalancing and replication was implemented. Each subject participated in three 15-min conversations ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1989
Some Effects of Variations in Response Time Latency on Speech Rate, Interruptions, and Fluency in Children's Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda L. Newman
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Ann B. Smit
    Kansas State University
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1989
Some Effects of Variations in Response Time Latency on Speech Rate, Interruptions, and Fluency in Children's Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1989, Vol. 32, 635-644. doi:10.1044/jshr.3203.635
History: Received March 28, 1988 , Accepted November 28, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1989, Vol. 32, 635-644. doi:10.1044/jshr.3203.635
History: Received March 28, 1988; Accepted November 28, 1988

The present study was designed to examine adult-child interactions during conversation with respect to the effects of adult paralinguistic speech variations on the speech production of children. Four 4-year-old children served as subjects. A single-subject A-B-A design with counterbalancing and replication was implemented. Each subject participated in three 15-min conversations with an experimenter. The independent variable was the interspeaker pause time—the response time latency (RTL). During the 15-min conversations, the experimenter used either a 1-s or a 3-s RTL when responding to the child. RTL was measured for each subject in each condition. Data analysis revealed that each child's RTL was significantly longer when the experimenter's RTL was 3 s than when it was 1 s, and all differences between all conditions reached significance for these subjects. Other dependent variables included speech rate, the frequency of disfluencies, and the frequency of interruptions produced by the subjects within each condition. All 4 subjects varied the frequency of disfluencies and interruptions. However, each child varied rate and disfluencies in a highly individualistic manner.

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