Speaking Clearly for the Hard of Hearing III An Attempt to Determine the Contribution of Speaking Rate to Differences in Intelligibility between Clear and Conversational Speech Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1989
Speaking Clearly for the Hard of Hearing III
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. A. Picheny
    IBM Research Division, Thomas J. Watson Research Center
  • N. I. Durlach
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • L. D. Braida
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1989
Speaking Clearly for the Hard of Hearing III
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1989, Vol. 32, 600-603. doi:10.1044/jshr.3203.600
History: Received November 20, 1987 , Accepted August 24, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1989, Vol. 32, 600-603. doi:10.1044/jshr.3203.600
History: Received November 20, 1987; Accepted August 24, 1988

Previous studies (Picheny, Durlach, & Braida, 1985, 1986) have demonstrated that substantial intelligibility differences exist for hearing-impaired listeners for speech spoken clearly compared to speech spoken conversationally. This paper presents the results of a probe experiment intended to determine the contribution of speaking rate to the intelligibility differences. Clear sentences were processed to have the durational properties of conversational speech, and conversational sentences were processed to have the durational properties of clear speech. Intelligibility testing with hearing-impaired listeners revealed both sets of materials to be degraded after processing. However, the degradation could not be attributable to processing artifacts because reprocessing the materials to restore their original durations produced intelligibility scores close to those observed for the unprocessed materials. We conclude that the simple processing to alter the relative durations of the speech materials was not adequate to assess the contribution of speaking rate to the intelligibility differences; further studies are proposed to address this question.

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