Evaluation af a Technique for Training New Speech Contrasts Generalization Across Voices, but not Word-Position or Task Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1989
Evaluation af a Technique for Training New Speech Contrasts
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David E. Morosan
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C.
  • Donald G. Jamieson
    Speech Communication Laboratory, Department of Communicative Disorders, Elborn College, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6G 1H1 Canada
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1989
Evaluation af a Technique for Training New Speech Contrasts
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1989, Vol. 32, 501-511. doi:10.1044/jshr.3203.501
History: Received October 27, 1987 , Accepted October 7, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1989, Vol. 32, 501-511. doi:10.1044/jshr.3203.501
History: Received October 27, 1987; Accepted October 7, 1988

We used the perceptual fading technique (Jamieson & Morosan, 1986) to teach unilingual adult Canadian francophones to identify the voiceless and voiced linguadental fricatives, /θ/ and /ð/. Training began with the identification of synthetic consonant-vowel (CV) exemplars that contained exaggerated amounts of frication (140 ms), with feedback given to identify errors and correct responses. Subsequently, stimuli with progressively shorter fricative durations were added to the identification set. After just 90 min of such training, francophone adults were better able to identify both the training stimuli and an untrained set of natural CVs produced by four different speakers, two men and two women. These results replicate and extend those reported by Jamieson and Morosan, and establish that such training generalizes to the identification of natural CVs produced by a variety of voices, both male and female. Thus, the effects of training are not restricted to a small range of acoustic cues. However, such learning was still strongly sensitive both to other aspects of the acoustic context and to the testing situation: Training failed to improve identifications of /θ/ and /ð/ phonemes when these were presented in word-medial and word-final positions, and identifications of synthetic and natural examples of /ð/ vs. /d/ did not improve, even though identifications of /θ/ vs. /ð/ were very good.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access