A Voice Accumulator—Validation and Application Studies of vocal behavior under natural conditions require suitable techniques for obtaining records of voice use. We describe the operation of a newly designed voice accumulator that allows registration of fundamental frequency and phonation time during a 12-hour period. The device is based on microprocessors and allows accumulation of the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1989
A Voice Accumulator—Validation and Application
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann-Christine Ohlsson
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Olle Brink
    Logikkonsult, Lund, Sweden
  • Anders Lofqvist
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1989
A Voice Accumulator—Validation and Application
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 451-457. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.451
History: Received December 14, 1987 , Accepted September 22, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 451-457. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.451
History: Received December 14, 1987; Accepted September 22, 1988

Studies of vocal behavior under natural conditions require suitable techniques for obtaining records of voice use. We describe the operation of a newly designed voice accumulator that allows registration of fundamental frequency and phonation time during a 12-hour period. The device is based on microprocessors and allows accumulation of the voice fundamental frequency within 60–600 Hz. The voice signal is picked up by a contact microphone attached to the front part of the neck. Analysis of fundamental frequency distribution and phonation time is made on a personal computer. Validation of the device shows it to provide accurate measurements of fundamental frequency, although it tends to underestimate phonation time. In a field test, the accumulator was used to analyze vocal behavior during two work-days in a group of nurses and a group of speech pathologists. Overall, the speech pathologists had a lower fundamental frequency level and higher values of phonation time than the nurses. These field results confirm the validation of the voice accumulator.

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