Comparison of Period-by-Period Fundamental Frequency of Stutterers and Nonstutterers over Repeated Utterances The fundamental frequency (fØ) of the first five periods in the acoustic wave form of vowels following stop consonant productions and the fØ of a period approximately 100 ms into the vowel were analyzed in the repeated fluent utterances of 10 nonstutterers and 10 stutterers both pre- and posttherapy. Group ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1989
Comparison of Period-by-Period Fundamental Frequency of Stutterers and Nonstutterers over Repeated Utterances
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pat Richard Sacco
    State University of New York, College at Geneseo
  • Dale Evan Metz
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1989
Comparison of Period-by-Period Fundamental Frequency of Stutterers and Nonstutterers over Repeated Utterances
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 439-444. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.439
History: Received May 31, 1988 , Accepted November 4, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 439-444. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.439
History: Received May 31, 1988; Accepted November 4, 1988

The fundamental frequency (fØ) of the first five periods in the acoustic wave form of vowels following stop consonant productions and the fØ of a period approximately 100 ms into the vowel were analyzed in the repeated fluent utterances of 10 nonstutterers and 10 stutterers both pre- and posttherapy. Group data indicate that the nonstutterers and stutterers showed similar fØ diminution patterns in vowels immediately following stop consonants. Additionally, the stutterers were not significantly different from the nonstutterers in their ability to achieve a stable fØ over repeated utterances. These results are discussed with respect to a previous analysis of the present data (Sacco & Metz, 1986) in which it was found that stutterers were significantly more variable than nonstutterers in their ability to achieve a stable fØ over repeated utterances. It is suggested that stutterings in the immediate vicinity of otherwise fluently produced words may influence certain production characteristics of those words.

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