Children's Categorization of Consonants by Manner and Place Characteristics Ten normal-speaking 5-year-olds and 10 normal-speaking 7-year-olds were required to categorize consonants as "dripping" (stop) or "flowing" (fricative) and as "tongue" (lingual place of articulation) or "lip" (labial place of articulation). Both groups of children performed more accurately than would be expected on the basis of chance alone. However, 5-year-olds ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1989
Children's Categorization of Consonants by Manner and Place Characteristics
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lucrezia Tomes
    University of Arizona
  • Ralph L. Shelton
    University of Arizona
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1989
Children's Categorization of Consonants by Manner and Place Characteristics
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 432-438. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.432
History: Received October 26, 1987 , Accepted October 24, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 432-438. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.432
History: Received October 26, 1987; Accepted October 24, 1988

Ten normal-speaking 5-year-olds and 10 normal-speaking 7-year-olds were required to categorize consonants as "dripping" (stop) or "flowing" (fricative) and as "tongue" (lingual place of articulation) or "lip" (labial place of articulation). Both groups of children performed more accurately than would be expected on the basis of chance alone. However, 5-year-olds performed more poorly than did 7-year-olds, primarily because 5-year-olds were significantly less accurate than 7-year-olds in categorizing according to manner. Children's ability to categorize was evaluated as an indicator of their awareness of feature characteristics of consonants. Their performance does not unambiguously reflect feature awareness but may be related to other variables such as their use of response strategies or the nature of the task.

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