Speech Breathing in Women Thirty healthy women representing three age groups (25, 50, and 75 years) were studied with respect to general respiratory function and speech breathing. Certain subdivisions of the lung volume differed with age: vital capacity, expiratory reserve volume, and residual volume. Speech breathing also differed with age and was characterized by ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1989
Speech Breathing in Women
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders
  • Thomas J. Hixon
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders
  • Mary Ellen Altman
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders
  • Wayne J. Morgan
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1989
Speech Breathing in Women
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 353-365. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.353
History: Received May 6, 1988 , Accepted September 20, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 353-365. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.353
History: Received May 6, 1988; Accepted September 20, 1988

Thirty healthy women representing three age groups (25, 50, and 75 years) were studied with respect to general respiratory function and speech breathing. Certain subdivisions of the lung volume differed with age: vital capacity, expiratory reserve volume, and residual volume. Speech breathing also differed with age and was characterized by differences in lung volume excursion, rib cage volume excursion, lung volume initiation, rib cage volume initiation, and lung volume expended per syllable. Age-related differences in general respiratory function and speech breathing are discussed in relation to possible underlying mechanisms. In addition, patterns of function observed in women are compared to those observed in men in an earlier investigation (Hoit & Hixon, 1987). Clinical implications are drawn regarding the evaluation and management of speech breathing disorders.

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