Multisensory Narrative Tracking by a Profoundly Deaf Subject Using an Electrocutaneous Vocoder and a Vibrotactile Aid A congenitally, profoundly deaf adult who had received 41 hours of tactual word recognition training in a previous study was assessed in tracking of connected discourse. This assessment was conducted in three phases. In the first phase, the subject used the Tacticon 1600 electrocutaneous vocoder to track a narrative in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1989
Multisensory Narrative Tracking by a Profoundly Deaf Subject Using an Electrocutaneous Vocoder and a Vibrotactile Aid
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael P. Lynch
    Departments of Psychology and Pediatrics, Mailman Center for Child Development, University of Miami
  • Rebecca E. Eilers
    Departments of Psychology and Pediatrics, Mailman Center for Child Development, University of Miami
  • D. Kimbrough Oller
    Departments of Psychology and Pediatrics, Mailman Center for Child Development, University of Miami
  • Richard C. Urbano
    Departments of Psychology and Pediatrics, Mailman Center for Child Development, University of Miami
  • Patricia J. Pero
    Departments of Psychology and Pediatrics, Mailman Center for Child Development, University of Miami
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1989
Multisensory Narrative Tracking by a Profoundly Deaf Subject Using an Electrocutaneous Vocoder and a Vibrotactile Aid
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 331-338. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.331
History: Received February 29, 1988 , Accepted September 14, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 331-338. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.331
History: Received February 29, 1988; Accepted September 14, 1988

A congenitally, profoundly deaf adult who had received 41 hours of tactual word recognition training in a previous study was assessed in tracking of connected discourse. This assessment was conducted in three phases. In the first phase, the subject used the Tacticon 1600 electrocutaneous vocoder to track a narrative in three conditions: (a) lipreading and aided hearing (L+H), (b) lipreading and tactual vocoder (L+TV), and (c) lipreading, tactual vocoder, and aided hearing (L+TV+H), Subject performance was significantly better in the L+TV+H condition than in the L+H condition, suggesting that the subject benefitted from the additional information provided by the tactual vocoder. In the second phase, the Tactaid II vibrotactile aid was used in three conditions: (a) lipreading alone, (b) lipreading and tactual aid (L+TA), and (c) lipreading, tactual aid, and aided hearing (L+TA+H). The subject was able to combine cues from the Tactaid II with those from lipreading and aided hearing. In the third phase, both tactual devices were used in six conditions: (a) lipreading alone (L), (b) lipreading and aided hearing (L+H), (c) lipreading and Tactaid II (L+TA), (d) lipreading and Tacticon 1600 (L+TV), (e) lipreading, Tactaid II, and aided hearing (L+TA+H), and (f) lipreading, Tacticon 1600, and aided hearing (L+TV+H). In this phase, only the Tactaid II significantly improved tracking performance over lipreading and aided hearing. Overall, improvement in tracking performance occurred within and across phases of this study.

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