The Interrelationship of Measures Related to Vocal Function, Speech Rate, and Laryngeal Appearance in Elderly Women The purpose of this investigation was to explore the interrelationship of various measures related to vocal function, speech rate, and laryngeal appearance in elderly women. Speakers were 20 women ranging in age from 67 to 86 years. An indirect laryngoscopic examination that included judgments on glottal closure and vocal fold ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1989
The Interrelationship of Measures Related to Vocal Function, Speech Rate, and Laryngeal Appearance in Elderly Women
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sue Ellen Linville
    Marquette University
  • Brenda D. Skarin
    Benton House Speech Services, Naperville, IL
  • Elio Fornatto
    Elmhurst Clinic, Elmhurst, IL
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1989
The Interrelationship of Measures Related to Vocal Function, Speech Rate, and Laryngeal Appearance in Elderly Women
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 323-330. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.323
History: Received October 9, 1987 , Accepted September 6, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 323-330. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.323
History: Received October 9, 1987; Accepted September 6, 1988

The purpose of this investigation was to explore the interrelationship of various measures related to vocal function, speech rate, and laryngeal appearance in elderly women. Speakers were 20 women ranging in age from 67 to 86 years. An indirect laryngoscopic examination that included judgments on glottal closure and vocal fold appearance was performed on each speaker. Eight measures related to vocal performance (the production capabilities of the mechanism with regard to pitch range, intensity range, and phonation time) were collected on each speaker. Further, acoustic measures of intensity and fundamental frequency stability were made from sustained vowels, and a reading passage was analyzed for reading rate and intensity level. Factor analysis procedures revealed an association of maximum phonation time with measures of vocal intensity, as well as with pitch range measures. Surprisingly, reading rate was grouped with measures of Fo stability as well as with maximum vocal intensity. Although laryngoscopic findings are in general agreement with those reported previously in elderly women (Honjo & Isshiki, 1980), inadequate glottal closure was observed more frequently, and vocal cord edema less frequently, in these women.

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