Frequency Resolution in Children The auditory frequency resolving ability of preschool children, school-aged children, and adults was assessed in a standard forced-choice masking experiment. Thresholds for pure-tone signals at 500 Hz, 2000 Hz, and 4000 Hz were obtained in two masking conditions. In one condition, the masker was a 4000-Hz-wide band of noise centered ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1989
Frequency Resolution in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Prudence Allen
    Waisman Center for Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Frederic Wightman
    Waisman Center for Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Doris Kistler
    Waisman Center for Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Terrence Dolan
    Waisman Center for Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1989
Frequency Resolution in Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 317-322. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.317
History: Received November 11, 1987 , Accepted September 6, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 317-322. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.317
History: Received November 11, 1987; Accepted September 6, 1988

The auditory frequency resolving ability of preschool children, school-aged children, and adults was assessed in a standard forced-choice masking experiment. Thresholds for pure-tone signals at 500 Hz, 2000 Hz, and 4000 Hz were obtained in two masking conditions. In one condition, the masker was a 4000-Hz-wide band of noise centered at the signal frequency; in the other, there was a notch in the noise spectrum, approximately one-half octave wide and 50 dB deep, centered at the signal frequency. Frequency resolving ability was inferred from the difference in signal threshold between the two masking conditions. The adaptive forced-choice psychophysical procedure was embedded in a video game in order to obtain rigorous pyschophysical data within the attentional limits of young children. This procedure produced data from children as young as 3 years old that were qualitatively indistinguishable from adult data. However, the threshold estimates from the children were more variable from run to run than were the estimates obtained from adults. The mean data from this experiment suggest that frequency resolving ability improves at all frequencies with increasing age.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access