Auditory Brainstem Responses from Children Three Months to Three Years of Age Normal Patterns of Response II Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1989
Auditory Brainstem Responses from Children Three Months to Three Years of Age
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael P. Gorga
    The Boys Town National Institute for Communication Disorders in Children
  • Jan R. Kaminski
    The Boys Town National Institute for Communication Disorders in Children
  • Kathryn L. Beauchaine
    The Boys Town National Institute for Communication Disorders in Children
  • Walt Jesteadt
    The Boys Town National Institute for Communication Disorders in Children
  • Stephen T. Neely
    The Boys Town National Institute for Communication Disorders in Children
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1989
Auditory Brainstem Responses from Children Three Months to Three Years of Age
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 281-288. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.281
History: Received February 16, 1988 , Accepted September 9, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 281-288. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.281
History: Received February 16, 1988; Accepted September 9, 1988

Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were measured in 535 children from 3 months to 3 years of age. The latencies reported in this paper should be unaffected by peripheral hearing loss because each child had bilateral wave V responses at 20 dB HLn. Wave V latencies decreased as age increased, at least to 18 months of age, while little or no change was noted in wave I latencies over the same age range. Thus, interpeak latency differences followed the same developmental time course as wave V. The shapes of wave V latency-level functions were comparable across age groups. These results suggest that changes in wave V latency with age are due to central (neural) factors and that age-appropriate norms should be used in evaluations of ABR latencies in children. Interaural differences in absolute wave V latencies and interpeak latency differences were similar to those observed in infants and adults, indicating that response symmetry is independent of age. Statistical analyses suggested that the distributions of absolute and relative latency measurements are normal, making it possible to describe norms in terms of means and standard deviations. A simple model is described that accounts accurately for changes in mean wave V latencies as function of age from preterm through the first three years of life.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access