Evaluation of Stopping Rules for Audiological Ascending Test Procedures Using Computer Simulations Stopping rules for ascending audiological test procedures were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation. The stopping rules differed in the minimum number of responses required at a level, whether these responses occurred on half or a majority of the ascending series, and whether all or only the most recent ascending series ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1989
Evaluation of Stopping Rules for Audiological Ascending Test Procedures Using Computer Simulations
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynne Marshall
    Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton CT
  • Thomas E. Hanna
    Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton CT
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1989
Evaluation of Stopping Rules for Audiological Ascending Test Procedures Using Computer Simulations
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 265-273. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.265
History: Received February 1, 1988 , Accepted August 16, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1989, Vol. 32, 265-273. doi:10.1044/jshr.3202.265
History: Received February 1, 1988; Accepted August 16, 1988

Stopping rules for ascending audiological test procedures were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation. The stopping rules differed in the minimum number of responses required at a level, whether these responses occurred on half or a majority of the ascending series, and whether all or only the most recent ascending series were considered. For all procedures, shallow psychometric function slopes yielded estimated thresholds closer to the level giving 50% detection than did steeper slopes, which yielded estimated thresholds roughly 2.5 dB above the level corresponding to 50% on the psychometric function. Shallow slopes also resulted in decreased reliability across threshold measurements, an increased number of trials required for threshold estimates, and a higher proportion of measurements that had to be repeated. Stopping rules using a two-response criterion were faster than those using a three-response criterion, with only a small decrease in reliability. Among stopping rules using the same number of responses for criterion, differences were seen primarily in efficiency for shallow slopes, particularly for procedures using a three-response rather than a two-response criterion for stopping. Results from these simulations should be useful to standards groups.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access