The Oral Syntactic Proficiency of Learning Disabled Students A Spontaneous Story Sampling Analysis Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1989
The Oral Syntactic Proficiency of Learning Disabled Students
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Froma P. Roth
    University of Maryland
  • Nancy J. Spekman
    Marianne Frostig Center for Educational Therapy, Pasadena
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1989
The Oral Syntactic Proficiency of Learning Disabled Students
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1989, Vol. 32, 67-77. doi:10.1044/jshr.3201.67
History: Received September 9, 1987 , Accepted April 29, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1989, Vol. 32, 67-77. doi:10.1044/jshr.3201.67
History: Received September 9, 1987; Accepted April 29, 1988

A comprehensive analysis of syntactic complexity was performed on spontaneously generated oral stories obtained from 93 learning disabled (LD) and normally achieving (NA) students, 14 to 16 each at 8:0–9:11 (years:months), 10:0–11:11, and 12:0–13:11 age levels. Syntactic complexity was measured using a structural constituent analysis and a T-unit analysis. In direct contrast to the extant LD literature, the results revealed almost identical rates of correct usage and extremely similar patterns of usage between the LD and NA subjects on all measures. Post-hoc analyses indicated that three syntactic structures were used by a significantly greater percentage of NA subjects than LD students. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to: (a) previous and current characterizations of syntactic abilities of LD students; and (b) the importance of differentiating between statistical and clinical significance for the meaningful interpretation of research data.

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