Effects of Decision Variables on Stimulus Dominance in Dichotic Listening Stimulus dominance occurs when one member of a dichotic pair is identified more accurately than the other member. The contribution that attentional factors, listener biases, and other nonsensory variables make to stimulus dominance was assessed by comparison of scores obtained in a conventional two-ear monitoring task with scores obtained in ... Research Note
Research Note  |   March 01, 1989
Effects of Decision Variables on Stimulus Dominance in Dichotic Listening
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Niccum
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Charles Speaks
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Jun Katsuki-Nakamura
    Kanazawa Medical University, Kanazawa, Japan
  • Ruth Leathers
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   March 01, 1989
Effects of Decision Variables on Stimulus Dominance in Dichotic Listening
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1989, Vol. 32, 184-188. doi:10.1044/jshr.3201.184
History: Received January 5, 1988 , Accepted May 3, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1989, Vol. 32, 184-188. doi:10.1044/jshr.3201.184
History: Received January 5, 1988; Accepted May 3, 1988

Stimulus dominance occurs when one member of a dichotic pair is identified more accurately than the other member. The contribution that attentional factors, listener biases, and other nonsensory variables make to stimulus dominance was assessed by comparison of scores obtained in a conventional two-ear monitoring task with scores obtained in a yes/no target-monitoring task. The target-monitoring paradigm is an application of signal detection theory to dichotic listening that allows calculation of d', a measure of perceptual sensitivity. Patterns of dominance for the two paradigms were very similar, which indicates that nonsensory factors had little influence in determining those patterns.

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