Laryngeal Configuration and Constriction during Two Types of Whispering Laryngeal functioning during the production of whispered speech is not well understood. The efficacy of whispering as a means of voice rest is a common clinical concern that is unresolved. This investigation examined vocal-fold configuration, glottal size, and airway constriction by supraglottal structures during whispering. Ten normally speaking adults produced ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1989
Laryngeal Configuration and Constriction during Two Types of Whispering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Pearl Solomon
    University of Arizona
  • Gerald N. McCall
    University of Maryland
  • Michael W. Trosset
    University of Arizona
  • William C. Gray
    University of Maryland School of Medicine
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1989
Laryngeal Configuration and Constriction during Two Types of Whispering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1989, Vol. 32, 161-174. doi:10.1044/jshr.3201.161
History: Received September 30, 1987 , Accepted July 1, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1989, Vol. 32, 161-174. doi:10.1044/jshr.3201.161
History: Received September 30, 1987; Accepted July 1, 1988

Laryngeal functioning during the production of whispered speech is not well understood. The efficacy of whispering as a means of voice rest is a common clinical concern that is unresolved. This investigation examined vocal-fold configuration, glottal size, and airway constriction by supraglottal structures during whispering. Ten normally speaking adults produced consonant-vowel syllables with three different vowels while whispering in low-effort and high-effort manners. The larynx was visualized through fiberoptic endonasolaryngoscopy, and the views were recorded on videotape. Analysis and descriptions of the data revealed that low-effort and high-effort whispering were differentiated to a small extent by vocal-fold adjustments and to a somewhat larger degree by supraglottal constriction. However, for each dependent variable, individual subject differences tended to be considerably larger than any systematic effects due to whisper type or vowel.

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