Frequency Discrimination Ability and Stop-Consonant Identification in Normally Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects Identification of place of articulation in the synthesized syllables/bi/,/di/, and /gi/ was examined in three groups of listeners: (a) normal hearers, (b) subjects with high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, and (c) normally hearing subjects listening in noise. Stimuli with an appropriate second formant (F2) transition (moving-F2 stimuli) were compared with stimuli ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1989
Frequency Discrimination Ability and Stop-Consonant Identification in Normally Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marleen T. Ochs
    Radford University
  • Larry E. Humes
    Indiana University
  • Ralph N. Ohde
    Vanderbilt University
  • D. Wesley Grantham
    Vanderbilt University
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1989
Frequency Discrimination Ability and Stop-Consonant Identification in Normally Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1989, Vol. 32, 133-142. doi:10.1044/jshr.3201.133
History: Received August 7, 1987 , Accepted May 23, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1989, Vol. 32, 133-142. doi:10.1044/jshr.3201.133
History: Received August 7, 1987; Accepted May 23, 1988

Identification of place of articulation in the synthesized syllables/bi/,/di/, and /gi/ was examined in three groups of listeners: (a) normal hearers, (b) subjects with high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, and (c) normally hearing subjects listening in noise. Stimuli with an appropriate second formant (F2) transition (moving-F2 stimuli) were compared with stimuli in which F2 was constant (straight-F2 stimuli) to examine the importance of the F2 transition in stop-consonant perception. For straight-F2 stimuli, burst spectrum and F2 frequency were appropriate for the syllable involved. Syllable duration also was a variable, with formant durations of 10, 19, 28, and 44 ms employed. All subjects' identification performance improved as stimulus duration increased. The groups were equivalent in terms of their identification of /di/ and /gi/ syllables, whereas the hearing-impaired and noise-masked normal listeners showed impaired performance for/bi/, particularly for the straight-F2 version. No difference in performance among groups was seen for /di/ and /gi/ stimuli for moving-F2 and straight-F2 versions. Second-formant frequency discrimination measures suggested that subjects' discrimination abilities were not acute enough to take advantage of the formant transition in the /di/and /gi/stimuli.

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