Selected Temporal Aspects of Coordination during Fluent Speech of Young Stutterers The purpose of this study was to compare the onsets, offsets, and durations of respiratory, articulatory, and laryngeal behaviors associated with the perceptually fluent speech of young stutterers (n = 8) to those of their normally fluent peers (n = 8). Simultaneous recordings of the targeted behaviors were made using ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1988
Selected Temporal Aspects of Coordination during Fluent Speech of Young Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edward G. Conture
    Syracuse University
  • Raymond H. Colton
    State University of New York, Health Science Center at Syracuse
  • John R. Gleason
    Syracuse University
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1988
Selected Temporal Aspects of Coordination during Fluent Speech of Young Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1988, Vol. 31, 640-653. doi:10.1044/jshr.3104.640
History: Received July 20, 1987 , Accepted March 15, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1988, Vol. 31, 640-653. doi:10.1044/jshr.3104.640
History: Received July 20, 1987; Accepted March 15, 1988

The purpose of this study was to compare the onsets, offsets, and durations of respiratory, articulatory, and laryngeal behaviors associated with the perceptually fluent speech of young stutterers (n = 8) to those of their normally fluent peers (n = 8). Simultaneous recordings of the targeted behaviors were made using noninvasive, minimally intrusive instrumentation. Specific temporal parameters of coordination—onsets, offsets, and durations of muscle activity and structural movement—were assessed within a particular component of the speech production system (e.g., onset of lower lip closing relative to lower lip opening muscle activity) as well as between different components (e.g., onset of rib cage deflation relative to onset of vocal fold contact for voicing). Results indicated that there were neither statistically significant nor apparent differences between the perceptually fluent speech of young stutterers and that of their normally fluent peers in terms of selected temporal characteristics of coordination. Findings suggest that the molar temporal characteristics of coordination for young stutterers' fluent speech production(s) are not appreciably different from those of their normally fluent peers and further, any temporal characteristics of stutterers' fluent speech that do differ from normal are probably brief, as well as subtle, in nature.

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