Unisensory and Bisensory Processing Skills of Children Having Misarticulations and Normally Speaking Peers The purpose of this investigation was to test the developmental delay hypothesis as a possible explanation for the existence of misarticulations in 7- and 8-year-old children. To accomplish this, 10 normally speaking children, 10 having mild misarticulations, and 10 children with severe misarticulations were administered unisensory and bisensory processing tasks. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1988
Unisensory and Bisensory Processing Skills of Children Having Misarticulations and Normally Speaking Peers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R. Dennis Hetrick
    Clarion University
  • Ronald K. Sommers
    Kent State University
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1988
Unisensory and Bisensory Processing Skills of Children Having Misarticulations and Normally Speaking Peers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1988, Vol. 31, 575-581. doi:10.1044/jshr.3104.575
History: Received June 15, 1987 , Accepted February 9, 1988
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1988, Vol. 31, 575-581. doi:10.1044/jshr.3104.575
History: Received June 15, 1987; Accepted February 9, 1988

The purpose of this investigation was to test the developmental delay hypothesis as a possible explanation for the existence of misarticulations in 7- and 8-year-old children. To accomplish this, 10 normally speaking children, 10 having mild misarticulations, and 10 children with severe misarticulations were administered unisensory and bisensory processing tasks. Unisensory tasks consisted of oral and manual form discrimination and auditory recall of word strings. Bisensory tasks were combinations of the unisensory ones and were of major interest, because this form of processing has been considered a test of children's CNS maturity. Results showed that children having misarticulations obtained lower scores than children with normal articulation on all bisensory tasks and had larger decrements from unisensory to bisensory tasks than control subjects. On unisensory tasks involving recall of word strings and manual form discrimination, differences were also found in favor of the control subjects. The results supported the hypothesis that delayed CNS development may coexist with misarticulations of 7- and 8-year-old children.

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