Coordination of Aerodynamic and Phonatory Processes in Fluent Speech Utterances of Stutterers It has often been suggested that there is a close relation between problems in the coordination of respiratory, phonatory, and processes and dysfluencies in speech production. However, empirical support for this hypothesis is scarce, because most studies of speech behavior have been restricted to a single motor process. The present ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1988
Coordination of Aerodynamic and Phonatory Processes in Fluent Speech Utterances of Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Herman F. M. Peters
    University Hospital 'Sint Radboud' University of Nijmegan Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Louis Boves
    University of Nijmegen Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1988
Coordination of Aerodynamic and Phonatory Processes in Fluent Speech Utterances of Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1988, Vol. 31, 352-361. doi:10.1044/jshr.3103.352
History: Received December 22, 1986 , Accepted October 8, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1988, Vol. 31, 352-361. doi:10.1044/jshr.3103.352
History: Received December 22, 1986; Accepted October 8, 1987

It has often been suggested that there is a close relation between problems in the coordination of respiratory, phonatory, and processes and dysfluencies in speech production. However, empirical support for this hypothesis is scarce, because most studies of speech behavior have been restricted to a single motor process. The present investigation examines the interactions of respiration (specifically the build up of subgloftal pressure), phonation, and articulation. Pressure build-up patterns preceding the onset of phonation were studied in 573 fluent utterances of 10 stutterers and in 552 utterances of 7 control subjects. Stutterers evidenced deviant patterns of subglottal pressure build-up much more often than did control speakers. Electroglot-tographic records of voice onset were classified as either abrupt or gentle and with respect to the presence or absence of gross irregularities in amplitude (shimmer) and period duration (jitter). Stutterers evidenced abrupt voice onsets significantly more often than did controls. The occurrence of jitter and shimmer, however, did not differ significantly across the groups. Acoustic measures of abruptness of voice onset, first syllable duration, and average syllable duration were also obtained, but they failed to differ significantly between the two groups. This study corroborates previous findings that perceptually fluent utterances of stutterers may differ, on a physiological level, from the speech of nonstutterers.

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