Criterion Validity of Speech Intelligibility Rating-Scale Procedures for the Hearing-Impaired Population The criterion validity and reliability of two popular rating-scale procedures for the assessment of the contextual speech intelligibility of hearing-impaired individuals (The NTID Scales) were studied under clinically typical conditions of test administration and evaluation. The criterion measure was a write-down procedure based on subjects' readings of sentence lists chosen ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1988
Criterion Validity of Speech Intelligibility Rating-Scale Procedures for the Hearing-Impaired Population
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vincent J. Samar
    The National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology
  • Dale Evan Metz
    The National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1988
Criterion Validity of Speech Intelligibility Rating-Scale Procedures for the Hearing-Impaired Population
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1988, Vol. 31, 307-316. doi:10.1044/jshr.3103.307
History: Received June 20, 1986 , Accepted September 25, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1988, Vol. 31, 307-316. doi:10.1044/jshr.3103.307
History: Received June 20, 1986; Accepted September 25, 1987

The criterion validity and reliability of two popular rating-scale procedures for the assessment of the contextual speech intelligibility of hearing-impaired individuals (The NTID Scales) were studied under clinically typical conditions of test administration and evaluation. The criterion measure was a write-down procedure based on subjects' readings of sentence lists chosen from The CID Everyday Sentence lists. Although the results revealed generally high overall validity and reliability coefficients for the two scales, a close examination of the distribution of estimation error over the full range of rating-scale values revealed gross violations of measurement prediction within the clinically most frequent midrange of speech intelligibility. The results indicate that the rating-scale procedure significantly compromises clinical and research classification of an individual's speech intelligibility and that write-down procedures may provide a viable and significantly more accurate alternative for speech intelligibility assessment.

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