Development of an in Vitro Technique for Measuring Elastic Properties of Vocal Fold Tissue The purpose of this investigation was to develop an in vitro technique for measurement of elastic properties of isolated vocal fold tissue. Larynges were excised from anesthetized dogs, immediately submerged in a Krebs-Ringer solution, and aerated with 95% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide. The tissue was maintained in the aerated ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 1988
Development of an in Vitro Technique for Measuring Elastic Properties of Vocal Fold Tissue
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adrienne L. Perlman
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Iowa City
  • Ingo R. Titze
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Research Note
Research Note   |   June 01, 1988
Development of an in Vitro Technique for Measuring Elastic Properties of Vocal Fold Tissue
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 288-298. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.288
History: Received June 2, 1986 , Accepted August 28, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 288-298. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.288
History: Received June 2, 1986; Accepted August 28, 1987

The purpose of this investigation was to develop an in vitro technique for measurement of elastic properties of isolated vocal fold tissue. Larynges were excised from anesthetized dogs, immediately submerged in a Krebs-Ringer solution, and aerated with 95% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide. The tissue was maintained in the aerated electrolyte solution throughout the experiment. The vocalis muscle was carefully dissected, with attachments to the arytenoid and thyroid cartilages maintained. The preparation was then subjected to isometric (constant length) force-elongation measures, which were converted to stress-strain values. Stage I of the investigation identified the dog model with the least intrastudy variability relative to the age, sex, and breed of the research animal, as well as to the effects of curare. Stage II investigated the effects of different instrumentation, definitions of reference length, methods of elongation, and effects of electrical stimulation. Once the procedure had been refined, the effects of age and sex were retested. There was a significant interaction between sex and strain and between age and strain. The least variability was obtained with curarized tissue from one sex of young, mixed-breed dogs, where an arbitrary 1 gram of initial force was the criterion for establishing "zero" strain. Problems associated with determination of reference length and various approaches to this problem are discussed.

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