Use of Adaptive Digital Signal Processing to Improve Speech Communication for Normally Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects A two microphone adaptive digital noise cancellation technique was used to improve word-recognition ability of normally hearing and hearing-impaired subjects in the presence of varying amounts of multitalker speech babble noise and speech spectrum noise. Signal-to-noise ratios varied from -8 dB to + 12 dB in 4 dB increments. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1988
Use of Adaptive Digital Signal Processing to Improve Speech Communication for Normally Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard W. Harris
    Brigham Young University
  • Robert H. Brey
    Brigham Young University
  • Martin S. Robinette
    Mayo Clinic
  • Douglas M. Chabries
    Brigham Young University
  • Richard W. Christiansen
    Brigham Young University
  • Ray G. Jolley
    Brigham Young University
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1988
Use of Adaptive Digital Signal Processing to Improve Speech Communication for Normally Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 265-271. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.265
History: Received April 20, 1987 , Accepted October 5, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 265-271. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.265
History: Received April 20, 1987; Accepted October 5, 1987

A two microphone adaptive digital noise cancellation technique was used to improve word-recognition ability of normally hearing and hearing-impaired subjects in the presence of varying amounts of multitalker speech babble noise and speech spectrum noise. Signal-to-noise ratios varied from -8 dB to + 12 dB in 4 dB increments. The adaptive noise cancellation technique resulted in reducing both the speech babble and speech spectrum noises 18 to 22 dB. This reduction in noise resulted in average improvements in word recognition, at the poorest signal-to-noise ratios, ranging from 37% to 50% for the normally hearing subjects and 27% to 40% for the hearing-impaired subjects. Improvements in word recognition in the presence of speech babble noise as a result of adaptive filtering were just as large or larger than improvements found in the presence of speech spectrum noise. The amount of improvement of word-recognition scores was most pronounced at the least favorable signal-to-noise ratios.

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